In this trailer you can hear the original score for Chinatown by Philip Lambro before the producer Robert Evans dumped it and hired Jerry Goldsmith. The difference is astounding.

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"So a good story will give you more dimensionality than you can ever cope with."

Walter Murch, Sound Designer, Editor, on 3D films

(Source: blogs.suntimes.com)

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the millenium kids: these are my thirty favorite movies in chronological order

nathanfisher:



I didn’t have to think too hard about this group of thirty, which is why I think it’s especially accurate. I really can’t imagine I’m missing something huge; also, the last two I cut were Punch-Drunk Love and Children of Men.

here you go, as of 11/12/10, my list:

The Lady Vanishes (Alfred…


Everyone has a list. This is my buddy Nathan’s list. He tends to like films that are innovative and that bring something novel to the film world. If you’re looking for something fresh, take a look at this list.

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Although this particular scene in the film Inception was my least favorite (a fortress for a neato shootout sequence; how convenient), it’s still cool they had this dude shoot some 35mil on SKIS!

Although this particular scene in the film Inception was my least favorite (a fortress for a neato shootout sequence; how convenient), it’s still cool they had this dude shoot some 35mil on SKIS!

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I just made a quickie 2009 demo reel today. Here’s to landing new projects to work on!

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Channeling creative juices with movie soundtracks

My good friend and fellow filmmaker Frank Hanley once gave me the best screenwriting advice ever: listen to soundtracks while you write.

I have attempted to heed this advice, but I don’t have a lot of soundtracks on my computer. However, what I do have is iTunes and its selection of internet radio channels. I am currently listening to Fistful of Soundtracks under the eclectic category. It’s got a pretty great variety of movie scores and songs – old and new. The coolest thing is that every now and then it plays a random old movie trailer. I just heard one for an old kung-fu flick. It sounds like the ones you’d hear on an old VHS tape before the feature presentation.

Anyway, if you like soundtracks, give it a listen sometime.

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This is Even Elroy’s music video I did over the summer.

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Last night I watched Chinatown featuring Jack Nicholson which was made in 1974.  I find myself particularly drawn to 1970s films in general, so it was no surprise that this was really enjoyable to watch.

My film history professor once claimed that American cinema died in the 1970s.  I can see why he might say that.  It was the era of true, first-time box office blockbusters.  However, it was also in my opinion, the decade that Hollywood had finally reached a height of technical proficiency that made cinema great.  It was the culmination of modern audio, film, and camera technique that, when coupled with a solid plot, a classic film was inevitably born.

I find films following the 1970s began to become increasingly formulaic as they attempted to appeal to the widest audience possible to achieve blockbuster success.  Part of the formula includes standardized  camera work (to the point of only traditional camera shots) and an emphasis on dialogue-driven storytelling as opposed to visual storytelling.  This is why I find a majority of films nowadays (e.g. Role Models, Year One to name a couple) feel incredibly sterile.  They lack significance and are far too predictable.  To veer from the mainstream cinematic formula would mean diminished revenues.

I have a lot more to say about this.  It probably belongs in an essay.  I’ll save it for later.

Last night I watched Chinatown featuring Jack Nicholson which was made in 1974. I find myself particularly drawn to 1970s films in general, so it was no surprise that this was really enjoyable to watch.

My film history professor once claimed that American cinema died in the 1970s. I can see why he might say that. It was the era of true, first-time box office blockbusters. However, it was also in my opinion, the decade that Hollywood had finally reached a height of technical proficiency that made cinema great. It was the culmination of modern audio, film, and camera technique that, when coupled with a solid plot, a classic film was inevitably born.

I find films following the 1970s began to become increasingly formulaic as they attempted to appeal to the widest audience possible to achieve blockbuster success. Part of the formula includes standardized camera work (to the point of only traditional camera shots) and an emphasis on dialogue-driven storytelling as opposed to visual storytelling. This is why I find a majority of films nowadays (e.g. Role Models, Year One to name a couple) feel incredibly sterile. They lack significance and are far too predictable. To veer from the mainstream cinematic formula would mean diminished revenues.

I have a lot more to say about this. It probably belongs in an essay. I’ll save it for later.

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